Keynote Speakers


All keynote addresses will take place in the Colonial room.
Bertrand Meyer


Bertrand Meyer

Global Software Project for a Globalized World

Slides from presentation

The teaching of software engineering cannot ignore the distributed, globalized nature of most of today's software development. ETH Zurich may have been the first institution to teach a course on "Software Engineering for Outsourced and Offshore Development" (offered by Peter Kolb and me since 2004). It has evolved into a course on Distributed Software Engineering and, in its recent incarnations, includes a distributed software project where students collaborate across several universities on several continents, reflecting the distributed setup of a large contemporary industrial project. The collaboration occurs solely across the Internet; it takes advantage of -- and occasionally fights with -- the most recent communication and collaboration technologies, from Wikis to shared documents and Voice Over IP.

The talk discusses some of the challenges of teaching distributed software engineering, the methods that we propose, and our first experience of a distributed course with a distributed software project.

About the Speaker
Bertrand Meyer is Professor of Software Engineering at ETH Zurich (the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology), which he joined in 2001 and was chairman of the computer science department from 2004 to 2006. He remains Chief Architect of Eiffel Software, the company he founded in California in 1985. He is the author of a number of books translated into many languages, including "Object-Oriented Software Construction" (Jolt Award 1997), "Reusable Software", "Introduction to the Theory of Programming Languages", "Eiffel: The Language" and several others, as well as many articles and over 60 edited conference proceedings. He has led the design and implementation of numerous tools and libraries used in production applications, including the open-source EiffelStudio environment, and serves as consultant to industry and government agencies. He is the principal designer of the Eiffel language and method, and the editor of the Eiffel language standard, accepted by the International Standards Organization in 2006. His research interests range over object-oriented analysis, design and programming, concurrency (SCOOP model), object persistence, development environments, software project management, software verification, automatic testing, formal methods, programming language semantics, and educational issues. He is the recipient of the Dahl-Nygaard object technology award and, in 2007, of the ACM Software System Award.
Speaker website

Michael Tiemann


Michael Tiemann

Exonovation: Leveraging The Innovation of Others

Slides from presentation

The S&P 500 isn't what it used to be: in 1930, companies on that list could expect to remain there for 75 years; today the average tenure is 15 years. In 1950, profits earned by the S&P 500 companies was 18% of US GDP; in 2000 it was only 6%. The very concept of innovation as a competitive advantage is increasingly contradicted by financial and economic metrics, not to mention a wide range customer surveys. A operational strategy identified by John Seely Brown and John Hagel in 2005 argues that the only sustainable edge is to leverage innovation /from/ the edge, a model that Red Hat has been successfully practicing since day one. This talk will explain how Red Hat operationalizes the strategy presented by Hagel and Brown, how Red Hat's outstanding financial performance is predicted by this model, and how Red Hat's basic product--IT Value--is essential to restoring the S&P 500 to economic and competitive sustainability.

About the Speaker
Michael Tiemann is the co-founder of Cygnus Support, the first company to provide commercial support for open source software, and wrote the original GNU C++ compiler. Cygnus was also one of the first companies to commercially support Kerberos, a network authentication and security library designed to work in untrusted environments. Michael became an executive at Red Hat when Red Hat acquired Cygnus in January 2000. As Vice President of Open Source Affairs, Michael advises leaders in the private and public sectors about Open Source strategy and technology. Michael serves on a number of boards, including the Open Source Initiative and the GNOME Foundation, and provides financial support for the Free Software Foundation and the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

Nancy R. Mead

Software Engineering Education: How Far We've Come and How Far We Have To Go


Nancy R. Mead

Slides from presentation

In this talk we'll trace the history of software engineering education and focus on some of the key players. Although the time has gone by quickly, it is more than 20 years since the first CSEE was held, and there have been many changes in that time period. We'll highlight the work that we have accomplished in the areas of degree programs and curricula, conferences and working groups, professionalism, certification, and industry-university collaboration.

We'll also look at the challenges that lie ahead -- the global reach of education, new delivery mechanisms, new professional efforts, and the need for us to engage in leadership in software engineering education. What new approaches should we be considering? How can we maintain our vitality? How can we best nurture new educators and encourage others to join our profession?

About the Speaker
Nancy R. Mead is a senior member of the technical staff in the Survivable Systems Engineering Group, which is part of the CERT Program at the Software Engineering Institute (SEI).

Mead is also a faculty member in the Master of Software Engineering and Master of Information Systems Management programs at Carnegie Mellon University. She is currently involved in the study of secure systems engineering and the development of professional infrastructure for software engineers. She also served as director of education for the SEI from 1991 to 1994. Her research interests are in the areas of information security, software requirements engineering, and software architectures.

Prior to joining the SEI, Mead was a senior technical staff member at IBM Federal Systems, where she spent most of her career in the development and management of large real-time systems. She also worked in IBM's software engineering technology area and managed IBM Federal Systems' software engineering education department. She has developed and taught numerous courses on software engineering topics, both at universities and in professional education courses.

Mead has more than 100 publications and invited presentations, and has a biographical citation in Who’s Who in America. She is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, Inc. (IEEE) and the IEEE Computer Society, and a member of the ACM. Mead serves on the Editorial Boards for IEEE Security and Privacy and the Requirements Engineering Journal, and is a member of numerous advisory boards and committees.
Speaker website

Special Speakers

These sessions will take place in the Gold room.
Joe Jarzombek

Cyber Security and Software Assurance: Enhancing the Relevance of Education and Training


Joe Jarzombek

Slides from presentation

In this presentation, Joe Jarzombek addresses the relevance of software security assurance in reducing organizational risk exposure. He provides an overview of software assurance initiatives within the federal government, and addresses requisite focuses for relevant education and training.

With today's global IT/software supply chain, software engineering, project management and quality assurance must explicitly address security risks posed by exploitable software. Traditional software-related processes and practices normally do not explicitly address software security risks that can be passed from projects to the organization. Software Assurance processes and practices span development and acquisition. Free resources are now available to assist organizations and individuals in managing software lifecycle activities. Moreover, significant public-private collaborative efforts are evolving the software assurance ecosystem and providing more comprehensive diagnostic capabilities to assist throughout the software lifecycle. Build Security In is one of the projects that develop and collect software assurance and software security information that helps to create secure systems.

About the speaker.
Joe Jarzombek is the Director for Software Assurance in the National Cyber Security Division of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS). He leads government interagency efforts with industry, academia, and standards organizations to shift the security paradigm away from patch management by addressing security needs in work force education and training, more comprehensive diagnostic capabilities, and security-enhanced development and acquisition practices. (see https://buildsecurityin.us-cert.gov and http://www.us-cert/swa) After retiring from the U.S. Air Force as a Lt. Col. in program management, Joe Jarzombek worked in the cyber security industry as vice president for product and process engineering. He served in two software-related positions within the Office of the Secretary of Defense prior to accepting his current DHS position. Throughout his career he has actively lead process improvement initiatives, including serving on the CMMI Product Development Team and later on the CMMI Steering Group. He has continued to co-lead efforts to integrate safety and security into integrated Capability Maturity Models (CMMs).